Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Nany Tendjoukian Cooks Armenian




















It's the "Week of Tasting" at my daughter's school.  To celebrate, I'm posting the photo and recipe of a close friend, Nany Tendjoukian, who happens to be Armenian (and who's grandparents were from Lake Van.)

Stuffed Vegetables, Armenian Style

The Vegetables:
Select an assortment of your favorite fresh vegetables: tomatoes, peppers, zucchini, cucumbers, cabbage leaves - anything that can be stuffed. Wash them, scoop out their centers, and rinse the insides with lightly salted water. Set aside until ready to stuff.

The Filling:
1 1/2 to 2 lbs ground lamb (Armenian lamb, if you can find it, is the best. Ground beef or even ground turkey can be used.)
3/4 cup to 1 cup rice, uncooked
1/2 of a 6-oz can tomato paste, diluted in 1/2 cup water
salt, pepper, paprika to taste
1 Tbps. lemon juice
3/4 cup chopped parsley

Directions:
Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl, mixing with
your hands.

The Sauce:
1/3 cup dried sumac berries
dash of salt and sugar
1/2 of a 6-oz can tomato paste
1 Tbsp. lemon juice
3 cups water

Directions:
1. Place the sumac berries in a tea strainer - or - wrap in cheesecloth and tie closed with twine.
2. Combine the sauce ingredients in a saucepan, and bring to a boil.
Lower the heat.
3. Simmer for 20-30 minutes. Discard sumac berries.

To Assemble and Cook:
1. Fill the cavity of each prepped vegetable about 1/2-way with the meat-rice stuffing. Don't fill completely; leave room for rice to expand.
2. Place stuffed vegetables side-by-side in a large pot.
3. Pour sauce over the veggies. Place a small dish on top of the vegetables, then put small pot of water on top of the dish to hold the vegetables down during cooking.
4. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat and cook for about 45 minutes, until rice and vegetables are tender.
5. Allow Dolma to rest for 1/2 hour before serving.

Monday, October 13, 2014

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Prehistoric Upland Lithic Procurement and Hunting Strategies in Denali National Park and Preserve, Central Alaska

Brian T. Wygal
(Link)

Abstract:

The Bull River II site represents an important alpine tool production site in the central Alaska Range south of Broad Pass.  Initial test excavations produced a sizable lithic assemblage and charcoal dated to the Younger Dryas.  A lithic analysis comparing Bull River II and the undated Costello Creek assemblages reveals biface production was the primary activity at both locations.  Discovered at relatively high elevations (>1000 m.a.s.l.), the sites reflect an underrepresented Eastern Beringian site type related to upland resource procurement and offer a basis for testing seasonal land-use models.

Friday, October 10, 2014

Shoreline
















Shoreline, 1936.  Emily Carr.  Beach at the foot of Beacon Hill Cliffs with Clover Point in the distance. (McMichael Collection)

"More than ever was I convinced that the old way of seeing was inadequate to express this big country of ours, her depth, her height, her unbounded wideness, silences too strong to be broken - nor could ten million cameras, through their mechanical boxes, ever show real Canada. It had to be sensed, passed through live minds, sensed and loved."1
1 Emily Carr, Growing Pains: The Autobiography of Emily Carr (Toronto: Clarke, Irwin, 1966) 228.